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Make a Beer Engine September 01 2015

Here's a neat -- and cheap! -- project: Convert a barrel that's past its prime into the ornamental part of a beer engine. It cost less than $50 in parts (RV water pump, 1/4" beverage tubing, swivel nut, MFL disconnect), and he put it together in less than an hour. There is no sparkler tip necessary, just some 3/8" gas line to reach to the bottom of the glass.

You could build and install the engine anywhere, really, but it looks pretty sharp with the barrel.


Purge CO2 from Kegs June 01 2015

For those of you who keg your beer, it's a good idea to purge your keg with CO2 prior to racking/transferring so that no air comes into contact with the beer.

Here's a couple ways to do this if you're racking from a fermentor to a keg:

1) Simply connect the gas disconnect to your gas-in post and allow the gas to enter the keg for 7-10 seconds. CO2 is heavier than air, so it will settle to the bottom of the keg, displacing the air as you rack your beer in to the bottom of the keg. 

Here's a variant of this step: Fill your keg with Co2 prior to racking, than use a screw driver to press the pop it valve on the liquid side to drive out all the pressure via the liquid dip tube.

2) Try connecting the gas disconnect to your liquid-in post, allowing the gas to enter the keg via the dip tube. Then rack into the bottom of the keg. A word of caution here: The gas disconnect is not designed to fit on a liquid post, so it might take some effort to remove the disconnect from the post.


Wine on Tap August 10 2014

Do you have a homebrew kegging system but also like to dabble in home winemaking? Try kegging your wine. Kegging is best for wines consumed young where freshness is key. With that in mind, wine needs to be under nitrogen gas mix (75%N,25%O2), so that your wine remains still when poured. Lastly, a Nitro regulator is a necessity. Normally Stouts and Porters are served under Nitro, try wine on your other tap! Last but not least, you will need some dedicated beverage line.